Below is a listing of all confirmed sessions.

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AL1

Presenter: Kaho Lo - Adobe
Host: Tony O'Dowd
With today’s rapid product release cycles, localization processes have to support multiple development branches simultaneously. Many teams are also moving to agile processes, where large epics are broken down into smaller feature stories, each with their own branch. Over the last few years at Adobe, we’ve devised various methods to address these problems. Some projects used a single super-dictionary, while others needed one dictionary per branch. There isn't a one-size-fits-all solution because each project has its own unique requirements. During this session we will discuss five different methods along with their pros, cons and how they can be improved.

AL2

Presenters: Gisbert Meyer - Olympus Europa SE & Co. KG  |  Christian Weih - Across Systems GmbH
Host: Inna Geller
For many enterprises the review of translations by subject matter experts (SMEs) in local companies is a fixed element of quality assurance. However, this task is also associated with a number of challenges. The texts are usually reviewed in the specialized departments by employees who have entirely different duties. Furthermore, several people often need to be included in the approval process, and their corrections and comments need to be entered in the texts and databases (translation memory and terminology system). This application report shows how the correction of translations can be handled with the help of the Across Language Server, regardless of the location. A seamless process, the easy, rights-specific inclusion of all parties involved in the process and a simplified correction mode for users with limited Across experience contribute to efficient, time-saving and resource-friendly quality assurance.

AL3

Presenters: Karen Combe - PTC  |  Christian Lieske - SAP  |  Antoine Rey - Venga Global  |  Felix Sasaki - DFKI  |  Yves Savourel - Argos Multilingual
Moderator: Ulrich Henes
Smarter and connected products are coming our way and we as an industry must get ready to meet the challenge. Made possible by cloud-based data centers and widely available internet access as well as cheaper processors and sensors, connected products can be serviced and operated more effectively and are driving competition and a global business transformation. Some of the Internet of Things (IoT) transactions involve mere data that does not require localization. Others will require live delivery of multilingual, intelligent content. In this session we will cover how localization technology can make the connection and enable rapid, multilingual IoT application development.

AL4

Presenters: Mina Ivanovic - Electrolux  |  Stefania Piva - Athena Parthenos
Host: Aurélie Baechelen
Developing a relationship that is solid as a rock and at the same time totally rocking takes a lot of effort, especially when the customer has a lot hanging in the balance. This is the case when a corporation is already a high-profile, globalized multinational with an international image yet might be older than the translators assigned to the task of internationalizing nuances and subtleties. Moving from a consolidated image to a dynamic one in the internet era requires a localization management with special features. So, how do you do that without rocking the boat?

AL5

Presenters: Jessica Rathke - L10N Sales & Marketing  |  Martin Schneekloth - Haufe  |  Bodo Vahldieck - VMware
Moderator: Maria Kania
Have you ever tried to set up a request for proposal (RFP) for translation services? You’ve got to build the process and generate questions that satisfy procurement, marketing or other departments. Maybe you’ve assembled your questions only to find that they’re not helpful for translation vendor selection or are too long and too complex to execute. It can feel like wrestling with an unruly beast. In this session we will show how to set up an effective RFP procedure. Expert panelists will answer questions to guide you in setting up a solid RFP so that it is clear to the vendors, it meets your company’s expectation and ultimately helps you choose the right vendor.

AL6

Presenters: Anne-Cécile Dousson-Lhéritier - Amazon  |  Patricia Gómez Jurado - King  |  Tommaso Rossi - Expedia Group
Host: Dave Ruane
The travel industry is dynamic, competitive and evolving at a relentless pace. Traditional online travel agencies (OTAs) are being challenged by multimodal, META and hotel/airline organizations themselves. In order to stay current and competitive, the OTA’s content must be engaging, emotional, fresh, targeted, focused on delivering an outcome and also delivered across multiple platforms. This presents a great opportunity for the localization team to provide the business with a variety of methodologies and processes designed to achieve tailored outcomes, at scale, and in a time-compressed environment. Understand how OTAs and their partners work together to implement what their business needs.

AL7

Presenters: Fernando Blasi - Alpha  |  Ellen Bruseker - Intuit
Host: Maxim Lobanov
Intuit was looking to explore new markets. As a localization team, they worked hard to gather content, handle formats, accelerate translation and get the product out. Success! Their product was out in a brand new language, in a brand new market where they had no resources. But wait… How to even begin to gauge the language quality? Learn how Intuit and Alpha CRC are partnering to establish a quality review model and provide unstaffed markets with linguists to bridge this gap. Find out how they are blending an in-house, in-country staffed model that will scale via an outsourced third-party review vendor.

AL8

Presenters: Henk Boxma - Boxma IT  |  Anke Kortenbruck - SAP
Host: Petra Dutz
In this presentation we will discuss the key aspects of localizing and translating cloud software. Hear firsthand how the requirements and processes involved in the localization of cloud software differ from the translation of onpremise software texts at SAP. You’ll also learn about the challenges that result from these differences and how they can be overcome by introducing new translation solutions. Using an SAP cloud application as an example, you will not only be guided through the entire process as it has been introduced at SAP, but also learn about the quality improvements and cost savings achieved through the implementation of this solution.

CS1

Presenter: Bill Swallow - Scriptorium Publishing
Host: Scott Abel
Content strategy has seen an interesting evolution of focus, from authoring and publishing smarter to embracing social media and personalization. The Internet of Things adds another layer of complexity: event-triggered communication. Devices and services can (and do) talk to each other in fragments, but at some point information about those interactions need to be organized and communicated in a human-friendly form. Proper localization planning is critical in this model. In this session we will look at content development and localization practices for these scenarios.

CS2

Presenter: Sarah O'Keefe - Scriptorium Publishing
Host: Scott Abel
What does the customer journey mean for localization? How can we deliver on localization requirements across the entire customer experience? In this presentation we will discuss how to integrate localization efforts across all customer touch points, and how this requirement affects overall localization strategy, both for localization managers and for localization providers.

CS3

Presenters: Diana Ballard - STAR Group  |  Charles Cooper - The Rockley Group Inc.  |  Laurence Dansokho - eBay  |  Michael Rosinski - Astoria Software
Moderator: Scott Abel
While the Internet of Things is exciting — and offers us many opportunities for innovation — it also requires us to adapt our content so machines can understand and process it on our behalf. This will be a fast-paced, 90-minute session with content industry experts working in the trenches; folks whose job it is to prepare content for consumption for both humans and machines. You’ll learn why componentized, semantically-rich, intelligent content is required to help smart products serve up the right content, at the right time, in the right language, to the right devices, automatically. Discover changes that will be needed in order to facilitate the Holy Grail of automated, dynamic, multilingual content delivery in a world where devices act on our behalf. And, find out what you can do today to get started.

CS4

Presenter: Charles Cooper - The Rockley Group Inc.
Host: Scott Abel
The world of content delivery has changed. While paper remains an option for some (and is mandatory in some cases), electronic delivery systems are the choice for many. As display technologies become smaller (and are now both carryable and wearable) and almost ubiquitous (screens in cars and home appliances) we have to rethink how we segment and organize our content so it can be displayed in its most effective manner on these different devices. Join us as we explain how you can design or update your content/localization strategy to take advantage of new and future content delivery systems.

CS5

Presenter: Diana Ballard - STAR Group
Host: Scott Abel
Join us as we take a look at high profile examples from modern US literature and how they might convince us — and our potential customers — that localization strategy has a massive impact on global revenues, just as much, in fact, as product or service design. As more focus is given to content marketing and intelligent content, we examine where localization fits in and why the new era of storytelling places more emphasis on fewer words, a global brand voice, together with more effective upfront globalization strategies. Today, our mandate is not just to translate, but to think of translators as cocreators. In this one-hour presentation, we’ll discuss why traditional models for translation must change in a global melting-pot where cultural-mixes are constantly in flux and why geographical boundaries should no longer be the only mandate of how or where to create or translate content.

CS7

Presenter: Ann Rockley - The Rockley Group Inc.
Host: Scott Abel
Agile is a rapidly growing method for the development of software. It emphasizes rapid iteration and adaptability. But agile is no longer just about software, agile is being used to improve translation processes. Agile translation results in shorter timelines, decreased costs, improved quality, increased ability to address global requirements and greater flexibility in web, mobile and print delivery. In this session we will provide an understanding of the methodology for moving to agile, how to address the challenges of change and best practices for agile translation.

CS8

Presenter: Matthias Gutknecht - STAR Group
Host: Scott Abel
Vaillant is a market and technology leader of living comfort solutions that includes heating and cooling products, systems and services. With a growing and complex business environment, in 2011 Vaillant’s information creation, translation and information delivery functions were faced with the task to do more with less. Several challenges had to be tackled and a different strategy had to be developed. Among the challenges encountered: no manual handling of country specific templates, reuse of content and translations, reduction of manual handling processes, increase of overall quality and improve quality and usage of terminology databases.In this presentation you will learn about:
  • The Vaillant strategy to overcome the challenges AND to prepare for the future
  • The project implementation and how Vaillant dramatically reduced the cost of information creation, translation and publication
  • Realized synergies and interesting key figures
  • How changing from unstructured content (using traditional desktop publishing tools) to structured content (using an intelligent content authoring solution) has brought significant advantages

GB1A

SPLIT SESSION
Presenter: Rosalind Smith - Localize Africa
Host: Rebecca Petras
In this session we will cover information about African countries; their past, present and future plans for infrastructure; the status of education in the past and now; the language groups and numbers; the fact that these languages were mainly spoken by agrarian or fishing-based peoples, and the issues faced in the translation of modern technological terms. These are all factors that need to be taken into account by anyone entering these markets.

GB1B

SPLIT SESSION
Presenter: Tea Dietterich - 2M Language Services
Host: Rebecca Petras
Not only thanks to its natural resources has Africa become an interesting export market for international investors and mining companies. However, governance and cultural aspects make it a challenging place to do business. Language service providers may not only be required to translate into a range of African languages but also to advise on tenders and communication strategies to bridge the cultural gap. A fascinating, colorful place with a promising future and considerable potential, yet daunting for many exporters, this presentation will give you a brief snapshot of Africa and pointers on doing business for those who are just starting.

GB2

Presenters: Chi-Wei Chang - Opower  |  Michael Stevens - Translated
Host: Tommaso Rossi
The internet of things is often about how to make a better product. Opower’s approach is to figure out how to influence behavior of the consumers using the product. When the average person thinks about their energy usage for only nine minutes a year, every word matters when trying to capture the uninterested consumer in this small window of opportunity, and as a team, Opower and Moravia address this challenge globally. Opower is a leading customer engagement partner of utility suppliers worldwide that, through the application of behavioral science to big data and assisted by Moravia’s ability to provide people with intimate market access, reaches over 50 million customers globally and has saved over 5 TWh. That’s enough energy to power the city of Munich, or a population of 1.3 million people, for a year.

GB4

Presenter: Luciana Vecchi - NetApp
Host: Karen Fowlie
How many times have you heard that there is a "gap" between the headquarters and the different geos? How many times have you tried something new to help reduce this “gap”? Many of us, especially from mid-to-large-sized companies, have tirelessly tried nearly everything from hiring international product managers to country partners to geo aligners. And the reality is that this “gap” is still there while many hidden opportunities are being lost. We all know that due to globalization of markets and high-sky technological advancements, many small companies are more than ever being born global. Meanwhile, the majority of the mid-to-large-sized firms are not interested or afraid of the internationalization process, fearing the unfavorable conditions of risk of lagging, decreased profits and revenues due to cost of introducing globalization. The uncertainty and common dilemma has affected many companies’ decision-making worldwide. The dilemma? Whether or not the introduction and/or expansion of globalization efforts realistically influence the company’s revenue. In this session, Luciana Vecchi will be discussing how she was able to develop a strategic model for globalization readiness from a professional paper during her MBA in international business to an scalable model called: Globalization Readiness: from Strategy to Execution.

GB5

Presenters: Petra Dutz -   |  Barbara Hoegler - Citrix  |  Markus Kuhnert - 1io  |  Angelika Zerfaß - zaac
Moderator: Andrew Lawless
The lack of a skilled workforce in localization is one of the leading contributors to the prevention of international growth. Exports of goods and services have stayed flat for many companies as a result, and especially growing companies such as Google, Facebook and Salesforce cannot find enough localization talent to fill their needs. This means that there are great jobs in localization that you can grow into. Panelists will discuss and explore localization jobs that are hot and future-proof and where to get the training to qualify for them.

GB6

Presenter: Jonathan Bowring - Riversight
Host: Sufian Reiter
What are the strengths and weaknesses of different models for an internal localization department? Where should it report, and who should hold the budget? Should it be a cost center or a profit center, treated like marketing or like an internal supplier? How much should you outsource? With lessons learned from leading an internal group through various incarnations and evolutionary stages, we will reflect on the advantages and challenges of different models during this session.

GB7

Presenter: Michael Bahles - VSE-University of Economics, Prague
Host: María Azqueta Arizcun
In international management there are observable difficulties in development processes and international alignments similar to situations in international diplomacy. In this presentation we will show an application of the theories and the concepts of international diplomacy to the international marketing practice. It is the first application of the concept of international diplomacy for management, especially the marketing practice. The used research method is a secondary analysis of existing theories and concepts of diplomacy in combination with expert interviews with international diplomats as well as international marketing practitioners. The results of this examination have interesting managerial implications for international marketing development processes, showing that virtues of international diplomacy can be adapted to the international marketing practice.

GB8

Presenter: Liesl Leary -
Host: Ulrich Henes
For the first time in human history, word of mouth is a digitally archived medium that’s impact cannot be understated. According to a recent Forrester survey of over 15,000 respondents, some 61% of European online adults trust brand or product recommendations from friends and family and 38% trust consumer-written online reviews. In this case study, we will share key insights about language and culture that have been gleaned from multilingual user generated content (UGC). We will also point to how the ability to model consumer behavior from UGC is changing the definition of what it means to localize.

IN1

Special Registration Requirement, this is an extended session and will run until 10:30.
Presenter: Rebecca Ray - CSA Research
Seating is limited and advanced registration is required. This session is limited to buyers of translation services only. Please contact us to reserve your seat.Are you struggling with how to manage external suppliers as content volumes increase, language support rises and delivery times get shorter? Are you looking for metrics to benchmark your team in this area? How do other companies measure vendor performance? Do you have the right level of automation? How can you move your suppliers along the localization maturity curve with you? Join independent market research firm Common Sense Advisory as they share data, best practices and recommendations from primary research with 73 vendor managers and executives at global companies. Take advantage of the opportunity to discuss challenges, insights and solutions with other enterprise buyers. This is an extended session and will run until 10:30.

IN2

Presenter: Maxim Lobanov - Google
Host: Teresa Marshall
The localization industry is changing and translators are loosing the respect they once had as well as many of the skills our predecessors enjoyed. Let's once again remember why the job of a translator is undeniably still important today and what a good translator needs in order to stand out among competitors.

IN4

Presenters: Chris Durban - Cabinet Durban  |  Michelle Miller - Wordbank, LLC  |  Anna Zierow - Google
Moderator: Kathy DiCenzo
Stakeholders in the localization industry talk endlessly about quality and spend a lot of energy attempting to nail this amorphous concept’s feet to the floor. Yet as vendors, we are selling something most clients do not understand and cannot judge: foreign language texts. Behind closed doors, even high-end vendors know there is little or no accountability and no practical follow-up on quality in language services. Instead the focus is on rates, deadlines and quality assurance checklists, while readability — the key to impact and effectiveness — takes a back seat. Join us for a panel discussion on language in localization and become part of the solution.

IN5

Presenters: Karen Loughrey - Spil Games  |  Steve Maule - Welocalize
Host: Donna Parrish
San Francisco software-as-a-service start-up Optimizely opened its EMEA headquarters in the Netherlands at the beginning of 2013. It quickly went to market with its product, a customer experience optimization platform and company website. After gaining huge international traction, with triple digit year-over-year growth, the business decided to expand its localized offerings and introduced a central localization function in mid-2014. In this presentation, Optimizely and Welocalize will discuss the key challenges that the business faced along the road to building out localization and how they’re tackling them.

IN6

Presenter: Hélène Pielmeier - CSA Research
What makes a language service provider (LSP) more evolved than another? To enable suppliers with a culture of excellence to distinguish themselves, Common Sense Advisory developed a model to assess the organizational maturity of LSPs. Instead of chanting “quality, service and price,” providers will learn how to make a more substantive statement about their evolved state. They will also be able to map out a practical path to move toward a more advanced maturity stage characterized by fewer failures, predictable results and higher profitability.

IN7

Presenter: Wafaa Mohiy - Saudisoft Co. Ltd.
Host: Maria Kania
A language service provider will share its experiences in moving from a single language vendor to handing more than 21 languages at the same time for customers covering different geographic areas.

IN8

Presenter: Talia Baruch - LinkedIn
Host: Paul Mangell
In this presentation we will offer the LinkedIn case study on the product plan for new market entry, providing examples from China, Japan and MENA (Middle East North Africa). We will provide a peek into geo strategy (identifying target market segments, local partnerships, business requirements, success metrics), as well as product geo-enhancements for new market adoption. We will also unveil key criteria for building bidi (right to left support).

K1

Presenter: Gerd Leonhard - The Futures Agency
Everything that can be digitized and automated, will be. Software is eating the world (Andreessen). Digitization, automation, optimization, disintermediation and robotization is now happening in all industries. Digital transformation — going from an analog or semi-digital world to a digitally-native world — is certain to be the quintessential challenge-opportunity in the next five years. How can people and companies become better at understanding, and faster at implementing, the transformations that are required? How will a company or an organization prosper in a world that is quickly becoming interconnected and interdependent? What challenges and opportunities are awaiting the localization business?

K2

Presenter: Iris Orriss - Facebook
Facebook’s mission is to make the world more open and connected, and to give everyone the power to share information. Why is it so important for people to connect? Connectedness puts information at people’s fingertips. Connectedness equals participation in the knowledge economy, which is the source of future growth, jobs and productivity. Connectedness creates opportunity. This keynote presentation will explore the role languages play in enabling Facebook's mission.

P01

Full-day Program - AFTERNOON SESSION, Special Registration Requirement
Presenters: Simon Andriesen - MediLingua  |  Henk Boxma - Boxma IT  |  Ann Rockley - The Rockley Group Inc.  |  Libor Safar - Moravia
Moderator: Clio Schils
In the world of translation and localization, the life sciences sector is different from any other industry because of the unique and specific nature of its requirements. With regulations changing on a continual basis, a premium is placed on quality above all else. For our Life Sciences Business Round Table in Berlin, we are delighted to offer a stellar one-day program with a particular focus on the challenges of life sciences localization. In this discussion forum, subject matter professionals, clients and vendors will be presenting and sharing their thoughts and experiences on specific processes as well as discussing the market entrance requirements and challenges in the life sciences industry in general.Breakout sessions as part of the afternoon program will allow attendees to continue a more in-depth discussion in smaller groups about subject matter topics.Clients, vendors and life science professionals from other disciplines are welcome to participate in this session. However, vendor participation is limited and subject to screening. If you would like to participate in this round table, please contact Clio Schils to obtain the admission code necessary for registration.Life Sciences Business Round Table Agenda9:00-9:15: Welcome and Introductions9:15-10:30: Synergies in Medical Localization – from Cost Center to Profit CenterPresenter: Henk Boxma (BoxmaIT), Host: Clio SchilsDuring this interactive workshop we will focus on how to achieve synergies between various departments within an organization.You, as a professional in localization, are responsible for getting your products localized. To do this, it is necessary that the different stakeholders send you their materials in localizable formats, provide reference materials and instructions. Basically, the translators need all content so they don’t contact the organization frequently with questions while doing their job. The same applies to the reviewers. How do you assure that they can review the materials in the local language efficiently?We will sketch the ideal workflow for localizing materials related to medical products such as medical instruments. These materials might include user documentation, user interface texts, marketing materials, data sheets and so on. Usually different departments are responsible for delivering the content for their areas, while localization is often done by a central department. To make it even more complex, many companies manufacture several products, have global offices and development sites, and so on.You and your team can change the organization! An important aspect is that you need to demonstrate to your stakeholders that they will clearly benefit, not only you. For example, instead of having developers write navigational instructions on how to find certain texts in an application, would it be possible for them to deliver something automatically as part of their (automated) testing process? And, what if these materials could also be used by in-country reviewers?10:30-11:00: Break11:00-12:30: Agile Translation for Life SciencesPresenter: Ann Rockley (The Rockley Group Inc.), Host: Sandra La BrascaIn the past, organizations have used a “waterfall” approach for translation where translation was at the end of the process and caused delays and frustration. Other organizations would try to get a head start on the translation, but ongoing changes as content moved through the regulatory approval cycle resulted in repeated translation and higher costs. Join this discussion to learn how life sciences can adopt agile translation best practices to rapidly respond to regulatory changes; provide the content that health care providers and patients need, when they need it and on the device they want it in; ensure that printed content is synchronized with electronic content; and respond to increasing globalization needs.12:30-13:30: Lunch13:30-14:30: The Importance of Readability Testing of Health InformationPresenter: Simon Andriesen (Medilingua), Host: Aurélie BaechelenIn the life sciences arena it is usually not enough to perform the usual proofreading and quality assurance (QA) steps. A translation error in a VCR manual is annoying; an error in a medical document can kill a patient! Very specific QA methods have been designed to assess the quality of medical information. Many people know what back-translations are and some have heard about cognitive debriefing, but few people know what is involved in readability testing. The focus of this presentation is on testing of patient information leaflets in European Union languages but also of life-saving health information (including Ebola warning posters) translated into a range of African languages.14:30-15:30: Multilingual After-sales Support in Life SciencesPresenters: Mark Hodgson (Moravia), Libor Safar (Moravia), Host: Simon AndriesenIn this session we will discuss the regulatory requirements as well as current marketing considerations for providing multilingual content to users of medical devices and pharmaceutical products “after their purchase.” It will show the regulatory framework and best practices for providing multilingual content for users who require immediate help as well as local-language content produced for their ongoing engagement. Session information will also shed light on the new trends in multilingual online support and how some of the leading life sciences companies embrace digital media to engage their local users and patients in order to manage their after-sales experience. Finally, we will outline the current regulations in the European Union, and their likely development relating to after-sales support for users, including vigilance and reporting of adverse effects.15:30-15:45: Introduction to Breakout Sessions15:45-16:00: Break16:00-17:15: Breakout Sessions and Presentations17:15: Wrap-up 

P01

Full-day Program - MORNING SESSION, Special Registration Requirement
Presenters: Simon Andriesen - MediLingua  |  Henk Boxma - Boxma IT  |  Ann Rockley - The Rockley Group Inc.  |  Libor Safar - Moravia
Moderator: Clio Schils
In the world of translation and localization, the life sciences sector is different from any other industry because of the unique and specific nature of its requirements. With regulations changing on a continual basis, a premium is placed on quality above all else. For our Life Sciences Business Round Table in Berlin, we are delighted to offer a stellar one-day program with a particular focus on the challenges of life sciences localization. In this discussion forum, subject matter professionals, clients and vendors will be presenting and sharing their thoughts and experiences on specific processes as well as discussing the market entrance requirements and challenges in the life sciences industry in general.Breakout sessions as part of the afternoon program will allow attendees to continue a more in-depth discussion in smaller groups about subject matter topics.Clients, vendors and life science professionals from other disciplines are welcome to participate in this session. However, vendor participation is limited and subject to screening. If you would like to participate in this round table, please contact Clio Schils to obtain the admission code necessary for registration.Life Sciences Business Round Table Agenda9:00-9:15: Welcome and Introductions9:15-10:30: Synergies in Medical Localization – from Cost Center to Profit CenterPresenter: Henk Boxma (BoxmaIT), Host: Clio SchilsDuring this interactive workshop we will focus on how to achieve synergies between various departments within an organization.You, as a professional in localization, are responsible for getting your products localized. To do this, it is necessary that the different stakeholders send you their materials in localizable formats, provide reference materials and instructions. Basically, the translators need all content so they don’t contact the organization frequently with questions while doing their job. The same applies to the reviewers. How do you assure that they can review the materials in the local language efficiently?We will sketch the ideal workflow for localizing materials related to medical products such as medical instruments. These materials might include user documentation, user interface texts, marketing materials, data sheets and so on. Usually different departments are responsible for delivering the content for their areas, while localization is often done by a central department. To make it even more complex, many companies manufacture several products, have global offices and development sites, and so on.You and your team can change the organization! An important aspect is that you need to demonstrate to your stakeholders that they will clearly benefit, not only you. For example, instead of having developers write navigational instructions on how to find certain texts in an application, would it be possible for them to deliver something automatically as part of their (automated) testing process? And, what if these materials could also be used by in-country reviewers?10:30-11:00: Break11:00-12:30: Agile Translation for Life Sciences Presenter: Ann Rockley (The Rockley Group Inc.), Host: Sandra La BrascaIn the past, organizations have used a “waterfall” approach for translation where translation was at the end of the process and caused delays and frustration. Other organizations would try to get a head start on the translation, but ongoing changes as content moved through the regulatory approval cycle resulted in repeated translation and higher costs. Join this discussion to learn how life sciences can adopt agile translation best practices to rapidly respond to regulatory changes; provide the content that health care providers and patients need, when they need it and on the device they want it in; ensure that printed content is synchronized with electronic content; and respond to increasing globalization needs.12:30-13:30: Lunch13:30-14:30: The Importance of Readability Testing of Health InformationPresenter: Simon Andriesen (Medilingua), Host: Aurélie BaechelenIn the life sciences arena it is usually not enough to perform the usual proofreading and quality assurance (QA) steps. A translation error in a VCR manual is annoying; an error in a medical document can kill a patient! Very specific QA methods have been designed to assess the quality of medical information. Many people know what back-translations are and some have heard about cognitive debriefing, but few people know what is involved in readability testing. The focus of this presentation is on testing of patient information leaflets in European Union languages but also of life-saving health information (including Ebola warning posters) translated into a range of African languages.14:30-15:30: Multilingual After-sales Support in Life SciencesPresenters: Mark Hodgson (Moravia), Libor Safar (Moravia), Host: Simon AndriesenIn this session we will discuss the regulatory requirements as well as current marketing considerations for providing multilingual content to users of medical devices and pharmaceutical products “after their purchase.” It will show the regulatory framework and best practices for providing multilingual content for users who require immediate help as well as local-language content produced for their ongoing engagement. Session information will also shed light on the new trends in multilingual online support and how some of the leading life sciences companies embrace digital media to engage their local users and patients in order to manage their after-sales experience. Finally, we will outline the current regulations in the European Union, and their likely development relating to after-sales support for users, including vigilance and reporting of adverse effects.15:30-15:45: Introduction to Breakout Sessions15:45-16:00: Break16:00-17:15: Breakout Sessions and Presentations17:15: Wrap-up 

P02

Full-day Program - MORNING SESSION, Special Registration Requirement
Presenters: Cristina Anselmi - Electronic Arts  |  William Barnes - Blizzard Entertainment  |  Angelina Bayer - Goodgame Studios  |  Daniel Finck - Loquatics  |  Arthur Flew - Blizzard Entertainment  |  Clara Gómez Pérez - Goodgame Studios  |  Jasmin Jelača - Nordeus  |  Nadège Josa - Sony Computer Entertainment Europe  |  Shane McCarthy - Electronic Arts  |  Dave Ruane - XTM International
Moderator: Miguel Bernal-Merino
This full-day round table consists of several distinct sessions presented by experts in game localization and is open to clients (game developers and game publishers) and to qualifying vendors (game localization specialists). We aim to provide the best possible venue to enable a fruitful and balanced debate. To this end, we will do our best to maintain a balanced group of participants. The day will end with an open discussion based on information and questions from the day's presentations.Space for this session is limited. Please contact us to obtain the admission code necessary for registration.Agenda:8.00-9.00: Registration and Coffee9.00-9.15: Welcome and Introductions9.15-10.00: L10n KPIs — Mission (Im)possible? Presenters: Angelina Bayer (Goodgame Studios), Clara Gómez Pérez (Goodgame Studios)Synopsis: “Data beats opinion” — if you’ve ever tried to convince your company to spend resources on a project, you will know that figures have an unmatched leverage. Key performance indicators (KPIs) are a popular and reliable way of measuring a company’s performance in many areas. With the help of metrics, we can devote our time and budget to the right activities, refine our processes and produce top-quality results. But to what extent can metrics be used to measure something as particular and hard to define as the success of localization? In response to this question, we have developed localization KPIs, based on a set of clearly identified localization objectives. These custom metrics cover the efficiency of our processes and workflows, as well as the success of localization quality assurance. We will present how we developed these KPIs, and talk about the issues we encountered when defining them. The presentation also includes an analysis of the data we have collected and how these findings can be used to improve the localization maturity of your company. Lastly, we will assess how the chosen metrics can help reach localization objectives.10.00-10.45: Localize Globally — The Top Eleven WayPresenter: Jasmin Jelača (Nordeus)Synopsis: This session about why and how to localize games in so many languages (42 currently). What is the return on investment and what are the challenges? How to maintain the quality and what are the processes around this to make it as efficient as possible for everybody involved? How to build and maintain a big community of translators and make localization testers out of them? And probably the biggest question of them all: How to make sure that the communication with the developers is at a high level? All this will be covered from the perspective of Top Eleven, the most popular online sports game.10.45-11.00: Break11.00-11.45: The Business Effects of Localization in the Video Games IndustryPresenter: Elle Kajiwara-Airey (Silicon Studio)Synopsis: The impact of localization for the business side of the games industry in often overlooked. How the quality of localization can reflect on the sales and reputation of a game or the game company itself will be addressed. The difference between planning localization into the game production from the start and just localizing a game as an afterthought has major implication on costs. Planning localization can greatly reduce the costs while making sure the quality is good. Also the concept of keeping costs down with cheap localization and how this will usually be more costly for game companies.11.45-12.30: Mobile Games Localization: Challenge AcceptedPresenter: Cristina Anselmi (Aeria Games), Daniel Finck (Aeria Games)Synopsis: Without a doubt, the booming mobile games sector is enjoying the biggest growth in the gaming industry at the moment. And of course, big numbers, high expectations and tight deadlines subsequently result in big challenges for localization. At Aeria Games, a free2play publisher that originally published mainly MMORPG-style games, the increase of mobile titles required the in-house localization team to rethink workflows from the ground up. In the process, new project and language management systems that would support a rapid-release frequency allow for economic resource allocation and maintain flexibility for the dynamic content typical for free2play had to be determined. In this presentation we will highlight some of the milestones made at Aeria Localization during this ongoing realignment, which is also majorly shaped by working exclusively with external development partners.12.30-14.00: Lunch14.00-14.45: Language Planning in a Global Games MarketPresenters: Dave Ruane (VistaTEC), Shane McCarthy (Electronic Arts)Synopsis: In today’s games market, making the right decision about localized languages is key to enhancing your company’s brand and maximizing the profitability and monetization potential of titles in the global market. Being able to successfully predict the performance of your title in local markets requires the right data analytics and approach. How do successful game companies approach language and global scale and what can you learn? Some of the questions game developers need to ask themselves include:1) Should our home (source country) market strategy dictate your global strategy?2) Are our global market decisions tied to legacy product, organizational or strategic decisions?3) What do good return on investment arguments for going global look like?4) How do we adapt to the varied legal requirements to reach local markets? Such as The Toubon Law in France, Violence, Alcohol, Gambling.5) What are our competitors doing?6) How are we future proofing for new markets, genres and platforms?We’ll present answers to these and other questions with real-world examples. We will also invite round table members to contribute. The goal is to share and inform on sensible real-world go-to-market strategies that can be applied across game genres and platforms.14.45-15.30: Until Dawn: Enhanced LocalizationPresenter: Nadège Josa (SCEE)Synopsis: What happens when a high profile title requires localization input over a two-year period? How can timelines change the approach on well-oiled localization processes? As games organically evolve during their life cycle and scripts get revisited, how can localization adapt to control scope change and minimize costs? Taking (calculated) risks, we'll share what benefits were gained from organizing one single recording session and one single pick-up session at optimal times. Localizing a horror game targeted at young adults (18+) whilst observing tight audio constraint requires ingenuity. We'll look at what initiatives were taken to create an upbeat script and audio. Finally, as an advocate of working collaboratively, using Sony's Localisation Asset Management System and DevTrack differently proved a great asset in bringing localization stakeholders together.15.30-16.00: Break16.00-16.45: The Benefits of Starting Localization Early Presenters: William Barnes (Blizzard Entertainment), Arthur Flew (Blizzard Entertainment)Synopsis: In an effort to curb some of the common issues one might experience with localization, Blizzard has taken a new approach in recent years by laying the groundwork for localization much earlier in their projects' schedules. In this presentation we'll be going over the various changes Blizzard has implemented to help facilitate the localization of their games and the benefits they've seen as a result.

P02

Full-day Program - AFTERNOON SESSION, Special Registration Requirement
Presenters: Cristina Anselmi - Electronic Arts  |  William Barnes - Blizzard Entertainment  |  Angelina Bayer - Goodgame Studios  |  Daniel Finck - Loquatics  |  Arthur Flew - Blizzard Entertainment  |  Clara Gómez Pérez - Goodgame Studios  |  Jasmin Jelača - Nordeus  |  Nadège Josa - Sony Computer Entertainment Europe  |  Shane McCarthy - Electronic Arts  |  Dave Ruane - XTM International
Moderator: Miguel Bernal-Merino
This full-day round table consists of several distinct sessions presented by experts in game localization and is open to clients (game developers and game publishers) and to qualifying vendors (game localization specialists). We aim to provide the best possible venue to enable a fruitful and balanced debate. To this end, we will do our best to maintain a balanced group of participants. The day will end with an open discussion based on information and questions from the day's presentations.Space for this session is limited. Please contact us to obtain the admission code necessary for registration.Agenda:8.00-9.00: Registration and Coffee9.00-9.15: Welcome and Introductions9.15-10.00: L10n KPIs — Mission (Im)possible? Presenters: Angelina Bayer (Goodgame Studios), Clara Gómez Pérez (Goodgame Studios)Synopsis: "Data beats opinion" — if you've ever tried to convince your company to spend resources on a project, you will know that figures have an unmatched leverage. Key performance indicators (KPIs) are a popular and reliable way of measuring a company’s performance in many areas. With the help of metrics, we can devote our time and budget to the right activities, refine our processes and produce top-quality results. But to what extent can metrics be used to measure something as particular and hard to define as the success of localization? In response to this question, we have developed localization KPIs, based on a set of clearly identified localization objectives. These custom metrics cover the efficiency of our processes and workflows, as well as the success of localization quality assurance. We will present how we developed these KPIs, and talk about the issues we encountered when defining them. The presentation also includes an analysis of the data we have collected and how these findings can be used to improve the localization maturity of your company. Lastly, we will assess how the chosen metrics can help reach localization objectives.10.00-10.45: Localize Globally — The Top Eleven WayPresenter: Jasmin Jelača (Nordeus)Synopsis: This session about why and how to localize games in so many languages (42 currently). What is the return on investment and what are the challenges? How to maintain the quality and what are the processes around this to make it as efficient as possible for everybody involved? How to build and maintain a big community of translators and make localization testers out of them? And probably the biggest question of them all: How to make sure that the communication with the developers is at a high level? All this will be covered from the perspective of Top Eleven, the most popular online sports game.10.45-11.00: Break11.00-11.45: The Business Effects of Localization in the Video Games IndustryPresenter: Elle Kajiwara-Airey (Silicon Studio)Synopsis: The impact of localization for the business side of the games industry in often overlooked. How the quality of localization can reflect on the sales and reputation of a game or the game company itself will be addressed. The difference between planning localization into the game production from the start and just localizing a game as an afterthought has major implication on costs. Planning localization can greatly reduce the costs while making sure the quality is good. Also the concept of keeping costs down with cheap localization and how this will usually be more costly for game companies.11.45-12.30: Mobile Games Localization: Challenge AcceptedPresenter: Cristina Anselmi (Aeria Games), Daniel Finck (Aeria Games)Synopsis: Without a doubt, the booming mobile games sector is enjoying the biggest growth in the gaming industry at the moment. And of course, big numbers, high expectations and tight deadlines subsequently result in big challenges for localization. At Aeria Games, a free2play publisher that originally published mainly MMORPG-style games, the increase of mobile titles required the in-house localization team to rethink workflows from the ground up. In the process, new project and language management systems that would support a rapid-release frequency allow for economic resource allocation and maintain flexibility for the dynamic content typical for free2play had to be determined. In this presentation we will highlight some of the milestones made at Aeria Localization during this ongoing realignment, which is also majorly shaped by working exclusively with external development partners.12.30-14.00: Lunch14.00-14.45: Language Planning in a Global Games MarketPresenters: Dave Ruane (VistaTEC), Shane McCarthy (Electronic Arts)Synopsis: In today’s games market, making the right decision about localized languages is key to enhancing your company’s brand and maximizing the profitability and monetization potential of titles in the global market. Being able to successfully predict the performance of your title in local markets requires the right data analytics and approach. How do successful game companies approach language and global scale and what can you learn? Some of the questions game developers need to ask themselves include:1) Should our home (source country) market strategy dictate your global strategy?2) Are our global market decisions tied to legacy product, organizational or strategic decisions?3) What do good return on investment arguments for going global look like?4) How do we adapt to the varied legal requirements to reach local markets? Such as The Toubon Law in France, Violence, Alcohol, Gambling.5) What are our competitors doing?6) How are we future proofing for new markets, genres and platforms?We’ll present answers to these and other questions with real-world examples. We will also invite round table members to contribute. The goal is to share and inform on sensible real-world go-to-market strategies that can be applied across game genres and platforms.14.45-15.30: Until Dawn: Enhanced LocalizationPresenter: Nadège Josa (SCEE)Synopsis: What happens when a high profile title requires localization input over a two-year period? How can timelines change the approach on well-oiled localization processes? As games organically evolve during their life cycle and scripts get revisited, how can localization adapt to control scope change and minimize costs? Taking (calculated) risks, we'll share what benefits were gained from organizing one single recording session and one single pick-up session at optimal times. Localizing a horror game targeted at young adults (18+) whilst observing tight audio constraint requires ingenuity. We'll look at what initiatives were taken to create an upbeat script and audio. Finally, as an advocate of working collaboratively, using Sony's Localisation Asset Management System and DevTrack differently proved a great asset in bringing localization stakeholders together.15.30-16.00: The Benefits of Starting Localization Early 16.00-16.45: Case StudyPresenters: William Barnes (Blizzard Entertainment), Arthur Flew (Blizzard Entertainment)Synopsis: In an effort to curb some of the common issues one might experience with localization, Blizzard has taken a new approach in recent years by laying the groundwork for localization much earlier in their projects' schedules. In this presentation we'll be going over the various changes Blizzard has implemented to help facilitate the localization of their games and the benefits they've seen as a result.

P03

Full-day Program - MORNING SESSION
Presenters: Belén Agulló García  |  Anne-Cécile Dousson-Lhéritier - Amazon  |  Fulya Kaplan - Sony Europe
Host: Alberto Ferreira
The Localization Processes Forum consists of a showcase of best practices, case studies and innovative approaches to improve globalization workflows. This full-day session will feature presentations from some of the leading lights of the industry, and will explore the new frontiers of localization project management with an emphasis on multichannel global deployment, testing and automation. Bring your own experiences and join the discussion on the future of localization services. Please click here for more information.

P03

Full-day Program - AFTERNOON SESSION
Presenters: Alberto Ferreira - dnata (Emirates Holidays)  |  István Lengyel - BeLazy Technologies Ltd.  |  Richard Sikes - memoQ
Host: Alberto Ferreira
The Localization Processes Forum consists of a showcase of best practices, case studies and innovative approaches to improve globalization workflows. This full-day session will feature presentations from some of the leading lights of the industry, and will explore the new frontiers of localization project management with an emphasis on multichannel global deployment, testing and automation. Bring your own experiences and join the discussion on the future of localization services. Please click here for more information.

P04

Full-day Program - MORNING SESSION
Presenters: Walter Bauer - censhare AG  |  Loïc Dufresne de Virel - Intel Corporation  |  Roger Fienhold Sheen - infotexture  |  Ryan King - Microsoft  |  Christian Lieske - SAP  |  Patrik Mazanek -   |  Marc Mittag - MittagQI – Quality Informatics  |  Robert Motzke - censhare AG  |  Kevin O'Donnell - Nitro  |  Phil Ritchie - Vistatec  |  Felix Sasaki - DFKI  |  Yves Savourel - Argos Multilingual  |  Bryan Schnabel - XLIFF  |  Chase Tingley - Spartan Software Inc.  |  Martin Wunderlich - censhare AG  |  Andrzej Zydroń - XTM International
Host: David Filip
FEISGILTT Federated Track is the business-friendly showcase and discussion forum of the 4th FEISGILTT and 6th XLIFF Symposium. This year industry and academic internationalization and localization interoperability experts will showcase and discuss XLIFF 2 and ITS 2.0 implementations. Requirements will be gathered for XLIFF 2.2 and status of XLIFF 2.1 will be shared with the community. Toolmakers, CMS makers and large publishers will discuss XLIFF 2 implementation success stories and lessons learned. Object model based interoperability beyond XML will be also discussed.

P04

Full-day Program - AFTERNOON SESSION
Presenters: Walter Bauer - censhare AG  |  Loïc Dufresne de Virel - Intel Corporation  |  Roger Fienhold Sheen - infotexture  |  Ryan King - Microsoft  |  Christian Lieske - SAP  |  Patrik Mazanek -   |  Marc Mittag - MittagQI – Quality Informatics  |  Robert Motzke - censhare AG  |  Kevin O'Donnell - Nitro  |  Phil Ritchie - Vistatec  |  Felix Sasaki - DFKI  |  Yves Savourel - Argos Multilingual  |  Bryan Schnabel - XLIFF  |  Chase Tingley - Spartan Software Inc.  |  Martin Wunderlich - censhare AG  |  Andrzej Zydroń - XTM International
Host: David Filip
FEISGILTT Federated Track is the business-friendly showcase and discussion forum of the 4th FEISGILTT and 6th XLIFF Symposium. This year industry and academic internationalization and localization interoperability experts will showcase and discuss XLIFF 2 and ITS 2.0 implementations. Requirements will be gathered for XLIFF 2.2 and status of XLIFF 2.1 will be shared with the community. Toolmakers, CMS makers and large publishers will discuss XLIFF 2 implementation success stories and lessons learned. Object model based interoperability beyond XML will be also discussed.

P06

Presenters: Richard Sikes - memoQ  |  Uwe Stahlschmidt - Microsoft  |  Angelika Zerfaß - zaac
Three highly experienced industry experts will illuminate the basics of localization for session participants over the course of three one-hour blocks. This instruction is particularly oriented to participants who are new to localization. Participants will gain a broad overview of the localization task set, issues and tools. Subjects covered will be fundamental problems that localization addresses such as components of localization projects, localization tools and localization project management. There will also be time for questions and answers plus the opportunity to take individual questions offline with the presenters.

P08

Presenter: Andrew Lawless - Team Lawless
At its best, translation automation allows companies to translate and publish vast amounts of content without ever touching it. No cost per word, no manual transactions, no bottleneck. In this workshop we will help you understand the key components of end-to-end automation for translation from authoring to translation, vetting and publishing. We will explore how to get one language out of a content management system and multiple languages back in without cut and paste or manual intervention. You will also learn about the gaps in technology that can sabotage your automation plans.After attending this workshop, you will be able to identify the technologies that your organization may need for full or partial end-to-end localization, including:
  •             Web content management systems
  •             Translation management systems
  •             Project management solutions
  •             Machine translation
  •             Crowdsourcing
  •             Middleware/Integrations
Agenda:What Translation Automation Does For YouYou will learn about the key benefits and return-on-investment scenarios and and claritfyies  for industry lingo. This session provides real examples that illustrate how translation automation boosts productivity, speeds up time to market, and lowers total cost of global content management.Technology Solutions That Work – And Don’tHere, we will define the different types of technology that can help with translation automation. You will see the whole scope of solutions – aund understand what works, and what you think should work, but does not.How to Get Started with Translation AutomationThis session is where we translate your new knowledge into action. You will identify the next three practical steps to get started and navigate the vendor landscape.

P09

Presenter: Andrew Lawless - Team Lawless
How much profit will your company generate with an increase in your localization budget? In this workshop we will help you develop localization metrics that matter to your executives. You will be able to make it a natural choice for them to fund localization, instead of cutting your budget. You will learn how to link localization to the executive agenda: revenue, profits, cash flow and growth. Instead, you are probably asking yourself: “What am I going to do now that my budget has decreased by 10%?”Who will benefit from this workshop and why?This workshop is geared toward managers of international projects, programs and products. Participants typically have one of the following or similar job titles:
  • Digital marketing managers
  • Director of localization
  • Director of web globalization
  • International product managers
  • Localization manager
  • Localization program manager
  • Localization project manager
  • Localization team lead
  • Manager — globalization program
  • Senior localization manager
  • Translation manager

P10

Presenter: Willem Stoeller - Localization Institute
In late 2011 the TAUS Dynamic Quality Framework (DQF) working group published its first report on translation quality evaluation. This report kindled a strong interest in translation quality management. In early 2015 Willem Stoeller created a new training course on translation quality management and DQF in close cooperation with TAUS. This training presents a comprehensive overview of a translation quality methodology combined with a review of the DQF tools for content profiling, quality evaluation, machine translation engine comparison and post-editing productivity. The course also includes a number of real-world case studies. All participants will receive free access to the TAUS DQF tools for ten weeks. This will allow them to complete the exercises detailed in the course materials. Upon completion of the exercises, participants will receive a certificate of completion from TAUS and the Localization Institute.

Objectives

  • To better manage the issues related to managing translation quality
  • To appreciate how different quality management standards can contribute to managing translation quality
  • To be able to place the TAUS Dynamic Quality Framework within the context of quality management models
  • To be able to use the DQF resources to guide your evaluation decisions

Target Audience

The target audience for this online course includes anyone interested in translation quality. In particular, translation service providers or buyer project managers, quality managers and lead translators, but also any other translation professional interested in translation quality using machine or human translation. This course is not intended for those who are new to translation or localization. In fact, it is recommended that you have at least three to five years of experience in the translation industry or an academic background in translation/localization.

Agenda

  • Overview. We’ll start with a review of what translation quality is, then will cover the project management standard ISO 21500 2012 and the translation quality standard ASTM F2575 – 14.
  • Dynamic Quality Framework. This provides a look at the initial findings of the DQF group as covered in their 2011 report.
  • Quality management methodology. Here we will review translation quality as a risk management problem. Translation requirements, quality evaluation methods, sampling, translation performance reporting and vendor balanced scorecards will be covered. This topic also includes a quality management case study that describes the design and implementation of a translation quality management process at VMware.
  • Content profiling. This describes one of the components in DQF; the content profiler. The importance of content profiling will be reviewed followed by a demonstration of the use of this content profiler.
  • Quality evaluation. Three of the most frequently used methods for measuring translation quality in a translation production environment — error typology, adequacy and fluency — will be covered. These methods can also be used when comparing the translation quality of different providers or machine translation engines.
  • MT engine comparison. Several evaluation methods used by human evaluators to compare different MT engines will be covered. The same methods are also used to determine the impact of additional training of a statistical MT engine.
  • Post-edit productivity. Here we will look at the time and cost savings introduced when using machine translation combined with post-editing.

P11

Presenters: Diego Bartolome - tauyou language technology  |  Peter Bourgonje - Infor  |  Gergely Horváth - Globalese  |  Maxim Khalilov - bmmt  |  Dragos Munteanu -   |  Tony O'Dowd - KantanMT  |  Deepan Patel - Milengo Ltd.  |  Michael Schneider - beo Gesellschaft für Sprachen und Technologie mbH
Host: Jaap van der Meer
Since 2013 we have been hosting Machine Translation Showcases at LocWorld events. These showcases were part of the European Commission funded MosesCore project. This project has now ended, but due to the high interest in translation technologies we have decided to continue organizing these showcases. We've made it a little broader and call them the "Translation Technology Showcases". We invite everyone interested in translation and translation technologies to attend this event. As at all TAUS events, we promise a highly interactive afternoon with a lot of time for questions and discussions.Please click here for detailed information.

P12

Presenters: Renato Beninatto - Nimdzi Insights  |  Anne-Marie Colliander Lind - LocWorld
Bring your sales and marketing challenges to this panel of experts and listen to their suggestions and potential solutions, LIVE! It will be an open consulting platform with experts in sales, sales management, sales training, marketing and public relations. Ask something, learn something, share something and take a lot home to act upon.

P13

Presenter: Vincent Swan - Pactera Technologies
This is a continuing, informal forum in the series of preconference day presentations by the GlobalSight team. There will be a presentation and demonstration of the exciting new features added to GlobalSight in the last year and a preview of some of the new features that are on the road map for implementation later in the year. There will also be an opportunity to meet some key members of the GlobalSight team and to discuss any deployment or setup challenges you are encountering. Items covered will be of interest to translators, administrators, technical teams and client users. We will share best practices and some tips and tricks to help you develop or improve your GlobalSight setup. Please come and share your feedback with the team or learn more about GlobalSight and our other technological solutions.

TS1

Presenters: Daniel Chin - Spartan Software Inc.  |  Bodo Vahldieck - VMware  |  Jaap van der Meer - TAUS
Host: Jaap van der Meer
Translation quality evaluation is a problem for many. The lack of metrics, common references and tools can cause friction, delays and increased costs. Not so for VMware. In 2014 the globalization team at VMware decided to develop a translation quality review platform based on the TAUS Dynamic Quality Framework. In this presentation we will present this case story and share their perspectives on how translation quality evaluation can be transformed from a painful and costly process into a strategic function for the enterprise. In support of TAUS' initiative to provide global translation quality benchmarks, we will also talk about the VMware Corporate Globalization team's plans to integrate their tool stack into the TAUS Quality Dashboard.

TS2

Presenters: Henk Boxma - Boxma IT  |  Jaap van der Meer - TAUS
TAUS presents the Quality Dashboard, made possible through an API that allows translators, developers and integrators to link with the DQF tools. Quality evaluation, for many considered a pain point in the translation process, can turn into a vital source of business intelligence. In this session we will discuss member use cases of Dynamic Quality Framework (DQF) and the roadmap for the Quality Dashboard. The developer of the DQF plug-in for TRADOS Studio will also explain how to get started and ensure a successful integration with DQF.

TS3

Presenters: Sharon Austin - Sajan Inc.  |  Klaus Fleischmann - Kaleidoscope  |  Arle Lommel - CSA Research  |  Yael Sela - Google  |  Antonio Tejada - Capita Translation and Interpreting  |  Bodo Vahldieck - VMware
Moderator: Jaap van der Meer
Translation quality is a trending topic at industry conferences these days. To pretend that this will be the "ultimate discussion" is pure irony. But we certainly have gathered a wise and varied panel of specialists. Two global software companies present their perspectives on methodologies and systems to ensure the most effective quality evaluation (QE). Two large language service providers present their metrics and scalable solutions. And one QE technology provider presents his software solution. Last but not least we have a researcher who presents the harmonization of DQF and MQM error typologies. And then there is you – the audience – who will take at least half of the session time (90 minutes!) to question everything and debate the ultimate solution. The panel will conclude with dos and don’ts: a take-away that will help everyone who faces similar challenges in their everyday practice.

TS4

Presenters: Diego Bartolome - tauyou language technology  |  John Moran - CNGL/ADAPT  |  Selçuk Özcan - Transistent
Host: Jaap van der Meer
According to the TAUS MT Market Report (August 2014) post-editing machine translation (MT) is quickly becoming a mainstream translation production process. Many translation memory systems connect with an MT system through an API and prepopulate all the "empty" segments. It’s time to review the current practices. In this session a technology provider, a researcher and tool builder and an entrepreneur who builds a dedicated post-editing business will present their perspectives on the state of post-editing. The presentations will be short to make sure that there is sufficient time for questions, answers and discussions. The experts on this panel will prepare some clear take-aways for the audience.

TS5

Presenters: Costantis Galantis - eBay  |  Lucie Le Naour - eBay  |  Luke Niederer - eBay
Host: Jaap van der Meer
eBay users expect our platform to be truly global. Machine translation (MT) is needed to support and encourage cross-border trade. The implementation of MT has had a positive effect on trade. The MT content we are dealing with at eBay consists mainly of user-generated titles, descriptions and search queries, which pose specific challenges in the creation of quality corpora for MT engine training and requires multiple and refined quality assurance (QA) processes. After a brief introduction to MT in general, this case study will focus on post-editing practices and challenges in the creation of MT corpora based on our experience at eBay.

TS6

Presenter: Andrew Lawless - Team Lawless
Host: Jaap van der Meer
Automating translation is easier today than it ever was. Cloud computing allows you to get started in an instant with a credit card. In this workshop we will introduce you to the key components of an end-to-end automation for translation including: content management systems, translation management systems, project management solutions, machine translation, crowd sourcing platforms and middleware/integrations.

TS7

Presenters: David Čaněk - Memsource  |  Alessandro Cattelan - MateCat
Host: Jaap van der Meer
Translation quality evaluation is an underserved feature in most CAT and TMS applications. There is a growing need for quality evaluation, but the challenge is to do it right. In this session presenters will talk about translation quality: what the users want and what it takes to implement an objective and efficient system. MateCat and Memsource are the first translation technology providers that have offered their users the ability to measure and benchmark translation quality, productivity and efficiency in the TAUS Quality Dashboard.

TS8

Presenter: Alessandro Cattelan - MateCat
Host: Jaap van der Meer
Open source technology has changed the way enterprises work and create products and services for their customers. Linux, Android, MySQL, Chrome and Firefox are some of the most popular and used products built on top of open source technology. Open source offers new opportunities to language service providers as well with solutions for machine translation, CAT tools, file format converters, quality check tools and even project management software. In this presentation we will describe how to use open source software to build innovative solutions with the goal of improving processes and workflows while remaining independent and free from any vendor lock-in.

UN5

Presenter: Session Participants
Moderator: Teresa Marshall
Interested in a unique track at LocWorld? Are you ready to join the conversation and discussions? Again, we are holding an “unconference” at LocWorld. Never heard of that? An unconference consists of participant-driven sessions, decidedly without the conventional format of a conference. There are no PowerPoint presentations and no sales pitches! There are only topics the group votes on. There is no agenda until the participants create one on the spot, at the beginning of the meeting.

UN6

Presenter: Session Participants
Moderator: Teresa Marshall
Interested in a unique track at LocWorld? Are you ready to join the conversation and discussions? Again, we are holding an “unconference” at LocWorld. Never heard of that? An unconference consists of participant-driven sessions, decidedly without the conventional format of a conference. There are no PowerPoint presentations and no sales pitches! There are only topics the group votes on. There is no agenda until the participants create one on the spot, at the beginning of the meeting.

UN7

Presenter: Session Participants
Moderator: Teresa Marshall
Interested in a unique track at LocWorld? Are you ready to join the conversation and discussions? Again, we are holding an “unconference” at LocWorld. Never heard of that? An unconference consists of participant-driven sessions, decidedly without the conventional format of a conference. There are no PowerPoint presentations and no sales pitches! There are only topics the group votes on. There is no agenda until the participants create one on the spot, at the beginning of the meeting.

UN8

Presenter: Session Participants
Moderator: Teresa Marshall
Interested in a unique track at LocWorld? Are you ready to join the conversation and discussions? Again, we are holding an “unconference” at LocWorld. Never heard of that? An unconference consists of participant-driven sessions, decidedly without the conventional format of a conference. There are no PowerPoint presentations and no sales pitches! There are only topics the group votes on. There is no agenda until the participants create one on the spot, at the beginning of the meeting.